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Closing Shot in Loudoun Magazine

You can find one of my recent photos in the Summer issue of Loudoun Magazine. The Closing Shot page features "Landing Goose" in full page print. This photo was taken at my friend's property. Joey invited me to explore her Mt. Gilead home and snap landscape imagery that may appeal to me.

After an hour of exploring the property, I heard geese flying overhead. In my usual reaction to such noises, I snatched the camera from the tripod and began searching the skies. I saw two geese coming in for a landing, at the pond next to where I was standing. Having only a few seconds to capture the moment, I frantically began shooting these large birds that were practically falling out of the sky.

The photograph below only depicts one of the two, obviously. Choosing this photo, over dual-geese shots, won out due to composition, clarity and impact. As I've written in previous posts, having the camera ready for anything eventually pays of.

I'd like to thank Loudoun Magazine for their interest in my work.

 

 

Update: The magazine link above now features an online version of the most recent issue.

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Photo to appear in Loudoun Magazine

One of my photographs will be published full page in the summer 2011 edition of Loudoun Magazine. It is expected to be printed on the last inside page. Shot in April, the owner of the Mt. Gilead, Virginia property invited me to shoot their lovely location.

While there, a pair of geese landed in the pond where I was standing. What a stroke of luck! While the second goose is not visible in this particular photograph, it made quite an entrance. It actually landed on the back of the first before finding its own place in the pond. I'll withhold posting the photo until it appears in the printed magazine.

Canadian Geese are a transitory part of Loudoun County. We tend to see them in spring and fall as they travel between Canada and more southerly routes. Their breeding patterns, and fondness of temperate climates, have them traveling thousands of miles in the name of preservation and comfort.

Dressed in black and gray feathers, they are easy to identify. They often stand out in contrast to Loudoun's emerald green backdrops. Unlike many other animals seen in Loudoun County, these ones often announce their presence, well before being seen. You can hear them approaching from a great distance away before actually seeing them. They tend to honk loudly as they glide across the sky at nearly 100 feet above the ground.

Update: the magazine has been published and is now available on newsstands. The link above leads to the online version, which shows the photo near the last inside page.

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